“… it’s tendency to return makes it extremely challenging and unpredictable. It’s one of the reasons it’s such an expensive condition to treat and that it’s such a wild ride.” Mural in Berlin Kreuzberg photo by howlzap Cologne.

To the uninitiated non-muscle invasive bladder cancer sounds like something mildly discomforting but not too dangerous. Anyone who has it knows that it’s tendency to return makes it extremely challenging and unpredictable. It’s one of the reasons it’s such an expensive condition to treat and that it’s such a wild ride.

I still catch myself wondering sometimes; “When will it be over?”

It won’t be over it will eventually be less centre front, but it won’t ever be over.

Patients of bladder cancer need lifelong regular check-ups. From 3 monthly to 6 monthly and thereafter yearly. Scanxiety is part of life for us and actually a welcome part of life as we need to keep our eagle eyes on the insides of our bladders.

There are many challenges on the wild ride, but the most important is to find a way to thrive. To thrive despite bladder cancer and to thrive despite setbacks. To find the healthiest version of ourselves. The healthier we are the better we can face new challenges. I see my recurrences and (no evidence of disease) NEDs as signposts on a path to achieving vibrant good health and thriving.

My current signpost is the poppy-red-patches. They’re being looked at in a biopsy operation on 31 January. Throughout January I’ve been carrying on with the routines that make me feel good.

Every recurrence has been a signpost to inch closer towards what makes me feel good. An invitation to listen to what my body tells me about what suits it, so as to thrive in mind, body, and spirit despite the wild bladder cancer ride.

What’s your body telling you?